Tuition.io helps you visualize your student loans, and organize them graphically in one site. Optimize your debt to find the best possible repayment schedule for your needs, and save money by tracking due dates and payments automatically.

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Persuasive speakers all have certain things in common. “It’s like they reach into us and ignite our hearts,” writes Evan Bailyn, professional keynote speaker extraordinaire. “Usually, it takes an issue—something an audience can believe in—to spark this type of fervor…they gathered the frustration, fear, and dissatisfaction. They articulated it in a way that made perfect, […]

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We live in a world rife with fraudulent claims. Ezra Pound described the phenomenon: “when the word is not constantly striving towards precision, the nation decays on its head.” Seriously, how great would it be if you could walk down the street of any American city, see a sign offering “Authentic Mexican Food” and know […]

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The private student loan industry smells a lot like the subprime mortgage industry: Dead ends, runarounds and few live customer service representatives to speak with. The same tactics that mortgage borrowers have faced are now happening for student loan borrowers, according to a new report from the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau. Read more HERE

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Over the last few years, student loans have become an unavoidable topic of discussion–even for those who don’t have any to pay off themselves. Working out a better system for the financial aid system was one of the Obama administration’s biggest undertakings in its first term, and it’s easy to see why: Over half of […]

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Average law school tuition for 2012 has risen more than double the rate of inflation. Not coincidentally, the number of applicants to law schools has fallen dramatically in recent years. This is strange because usually when the demand for a commodity falls, the price drops as well. So why is the price still going up? […]

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By Priya Krishnakumar for Tuition.io   It’s time to talk about the 1%. No, not the focus of last year’s Occupy Wall Street protests—the other, unluckier 1%–a small percent of people who, according to the Federal Reserve bank of New York, owe over $150,000 in outstanding student loans.

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